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From the book "Prayer"

106 The life of a person who prays is a reflection of his prayer, and his prayer is a reflection of the life he leads; it follows that life of prayer is inconceivable without a genuine effort to live as a Christian.

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"The Mystery of Prayer"

Written by Marcia Maranksi on .

 

     Father Alfonso Galvez has written about Prayer, beautifully and comprehensively, directly and indirectly, many times in his writings. In The Mystery of Prayer he attempts to give the reader a small glimpse into the depth and reality of mystical or contemplative prayer.

     Father Galvez states at the outset that it is simply not possible to learn how to practice contemplative prayer: never in three days nor in a thousand years, not even if one were able to live one hundred thousand lives. Contemplative prayer is something essentially supernatural and a gratuitous gift from God that He grants to whomever and whenever He wants; therefore … nobody can merit it, for it belongs to a level so high that man’s natural powers cannot reach it.

     The author knows very well the two great Spanish Mystics and Doctors of the Church, Saint Teresa of Avila and Saint John of the Cross. The three have more in common than their native land. Each gives readers invaluable insights into the subject of prayer. However, both Mystical Doctors offer a method which Father observes as having some obscure, or seemingly austere, points contained in their spirituality: Saint Teresa speaks of a more passive method of contemplation in which a shower of the soft rain of grace can be received by the soul without effort. Saint John emphasizes in his doctrine that the soul should be divested of absolutely everything: embracing Nothing. The Night of the senses and of the spirit.

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Homily October 19th, 2014

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

19th Sunday after Pentecost

Gospel: Mt 22: 1-14

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Homily October 19th, 2014 (Second)

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

19th Sunday after Pentecost (Second)

Gospel: Mt 22: 1-14

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A Lone Bishop

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

 

          That a Bishop dares to defend the Faith, of all things, and is left alone without anybody following him and supporting him is an old story within the Church. Sometimes such a Bishop is not only abandoned but also viciously persecuted and, if possible, destroyed. This is something that has seemingly become customary in the Church. The story of Saint Athanasius, Bishop of Alexandria in the 4th century, invincible champion in the struggle against the Arian heresy, imprisoned and expelled from his See as many as five times, repeats itself throughout the history of the Church even up till today.

          Nowadays, everybody knows the case of Most Reverend Rogelio Liviares, Bishop of Ciudad del Este, Paraguay. His ministry as Bishop is well known, which dispenses us from entering into any details. The Episcopal Conference of Paraguay was the very accusing finger pointed at the unfortunate Prelate (the lives and miracles of the members of the Episcopal Conference are also quite notorious) as if he were somewhat less than a criminal.

          Nevertheless, something in this whole affair calls our attention most powerfully. The Government of the Prelature Opus Dei (of which Bishop Liviares is a member) quickly distanced itself from him and his declaration of obedience to Tradition and his exhortations to his seminarians to be faithful to it and to maintain his obedient attitude.

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Homily October 12th, 2014 (Second)

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

Feast of the "Virgin of Pilar" Patron of Spain

Gospel: Lk 11: 27-28

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Homily October 12th, 2014

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

18th Sunday after Pentecost

Gospel: Mt 9: 1-8; Mc 2: 1-12

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Stupidity: Man’s Outstanding Quality

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

         

          Stupidity is the only thing in which man can emulate Divine Being in regard to His Infinity.

(Chinese Proverb)

 

         The old Vulgate Bible said that the number of fools is infinite;[1] this is how Saint Jerome translated this passage. This text is modified in the modern versions of the Bible which began to appear toward the second half of the 20th century. One can read quite a different text in the Neo-Vulgate version, a revision mandated by the Second Vatican Council: Quod est curvum, rectum fieri non potest; et, quod deficiens est, numerari non potest, which some translate as what is twisted cannot be straightened, what is not there cannot be counted; quite different from the Jeromian original. Modern exegetes will provide us with multiple explanations about current biblical studies, etc., which we, mere mortals, will not challenge. At any rate, we can rest assured, for this is such an obvious statement that we do not need the Bible to tell us so. In effect, anyone can easily realize that the number of fools is infinite.

         Those of us who were young toward the middle of the past century were astounded at what used to be said then, namely that since the United States of America was still a young country, its History textbooks did not have enough material for lucubration; therefore, it was small wonder they devoted several chapters to describing the appearance and the biography of the dog of the doctor of Abraham Lincoln. We can safely assume that this was an exaggerated account in the mouth of some people; nevertheless, it is also possible that future generations will think it an exaggeration when they hear that in these days more than a hundred thousand people gathered in Madrid to protest the termination (for obvious security reasons) of the dog of the nurse infected with ebola virus. As anyone can understand, the demise of this dog is the most serious problem today in Spain (all other problems have not deserved the slightest voice of protest). The word is going around that the Spaniards have lost their mind; a statement that would have been endorsed by Aristotle himself if he were alive.   

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