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From the book "Prayer"

1 Prayer is a vast subject, both in importance and in range; and anything we manage to say about it will always fall too short and convey almost nothing. But let us put ourselves in God's hands, humbly and trustingly, so that He guides us along the ways that lead to that only thing necessary.

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The Morning Star

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

 

And he that shall overcome and keep my words unto the end, I will give him power over the nations… And I will give him the morning star

         (Letter to the Church of Thyatira, Apocalypse 2: 26.28)

The most important of these promises made to the Elect, contained in the Letter to the Angel of the Church of Thyatira in the Apocalypse, is undoubtedly the last one, for the first promise is actually contained in the second.  

One can easily see what this promise means if one considers another passage of the Apocalypse: I, Jesus, have sent my angel, to testify to you these things in the churches. I am the root and stock of David, the bright and morning star (Apoc 22:16, stella splendida matutina).

At a closer look, this promise coincides, although employing different expressions, with those made to the churches of Ephesus and Pergamus: the tree of life and the white stone with a new name written on it. The promises made to the other four churches are simply explanations or consequences of the one we are considering.

God is the Supreme Remunerator. He gives Himself as a reward to those who love Him; more cannot be offered. Consequently, the reward to be received by the winner is none other than Jesus Christ Himself, fully owned and possessed.

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Homily November 16th, 2014

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

XXIII Sunday after Pentecost

Gospel: Mt 9: 18-26

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Homily November 16th, 2014 (Second)

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

XXIII Sunday after Pentecost

Gospel: Mt 9: 18-26

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Searching the Lord in Prayer

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

 

The soul who with yearning desire tries to find her Lord through prayer, despite her sorrow in not having found Him yet, feels her heart overflowing with the joy of her search.  As happens with the thirsty man who, walking in the desert, senses water nearby, the possibility of meeting Jesus increases the soul’s longing and joy because of her very near and greatly anticipated encounter. God is not without compassion for those many poor souls who, loaded with the weight of their sins and their many faults not yet amended for, consider themselves sufficiently paid if they are just allowed to look for Him. Because, in the end, every one that asketh, receiveth; and he that seeketh, findeth; and to him that knocketh, it shall be opened (Mt 7:8; Lk 11:10). And if God is able to take the form of a humble pilgrim who knocks at the door begging to be opened,

 

Open to me, my sister, my love,
My dove, my undefiled.
For my head is full of dew
And my locks of the drops of the night. (Sg 5: 2-3)

 

the souls that know they are too small are content, for that very reason, with a longing for the crumbs that fall from their master’s table (Mt 15:27). Contemplative prayer, high degrees of union with God, an intimate loving relationship between the Bridegroom and the bride… But perhaps these numerous souls –have we not sometimes felt tears of joy flowing down our cheeks when we realized that we were among them?—, like the blind man at Jericho, dare only attempt to follow him in the way (Mk 10:52), although from afar; just this makes them happy.

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Homily November 9th, 2014 (for young people)

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

Feast of the Dedication of the Lateran Basilica in Rome

Gospel: Lk 19: 1-10

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Homily November 9th, 2014

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

Feast of the Dedication of the Lateran Basilica in Rome

Gospel: Lk 19: 1-10

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Abridged Memories of an Elderly Priest

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

 

[Note: I testify that everything in this abridged account, the ironic as well as the more serious content, is absolutely true. Yet it is regrettable that the peculiarities of the media impose a necessary limitation to what could have been an interesting and prolix narrative.]

 

I was ordained to the Priesthood in June of the Year of Our Lord 1956, under the Pontificate of Pius XII, a few days after I turned twenty-four years of age. It must be well understood that by using the expression the Year of Our Lord I am not falling back to an old literary style; in fact, if someone came to think that this expression is used here ironically… he would surely be right.

They say that the day of First Communion is the happiest day in one’s life, but it is not true. For the happiest day in a man’s existence, much more by far than any other day, is the day of his Priestly Ordination. At least that was the case for those of us who were ordained in the days when there was a firm belief in the Priesthood, the Holiness of the Church, and when the Faith was prevalent among the Christian People. I remember the excitement of the ceremony, the eagerness with which we awaited it during the days and months leading up to it, and the immense joy we all felt when we returned in procession to the Archbishop's Palace. My heart resounded with triumphant echoes of Psalm 126: Coming they shall come with joyfulness, carrying their sheaves.

My Bishop was an elderly Catalan gentleman who could barely speak Castilian; (one of those bishops proposed by Francisco Franco in his well-known list of three candidates presented to the Holy See). I always thought that he had probably been transferred from some lost parish in the Catalan countryside. And although he was a man of great piety and profound faith, he would be considered today (because of these very reasons) an accursed Bishop.  I still think, however, that I wish we had some bishops like him these days.  

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Homily November 2nd. 2014

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

21st Sunday after Pentecost

Gospel: Mt 18: 23-35

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Homily November 1st. 2014

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

All Saints Feast

Gospel: Mt 5: 1-12

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The new Archbishop of Madrid speaks to the press

Written by P. Alfonso Gálvez on .

 

[Note: The following reflections about the statements made by the Archbishop of Madrid to the press two days after his inauguration are taken from the summary that a journalist penned, based on a recording he made and which appeared on the website of Infovaticana on October 25. I cannot guarantee, therefore, accuracy other than that provided by the professionalism of the journalist who transcribed the words of the Archbishop.]

 

First of all, one must admit that the statements contain enough ambiguities and subliminal references to the Synod on the Family (without mentioning it, of course) and to the many revolutionary doctrines of Pope Francis that one may think that they do not deserve the effort necessary to discuss them even briefly.

Except in very rare instances, I do not usually read the statements of the Spanish Bishops. My time is very limited and their poor theological, pastoral, and intellectual formation is widely known, not to mention the little credibility that the content of their statements deserve. In this case, however, there was something that powerfully called my attention and consequently raised the red flags. In effect, the prominent neo-Catholic webpages, usually so prone to singing the praises of the Hierarchy, were now dead silent; once again they fell into their customary error: hiding, or at least trying to conceal, anything that could possibly bring discredit upon the Hierarchy; forgetting, once again, that hiding the truth is tantamount to aiding and abetting the dissemination of lies. But neo-Catholics are hopeless; they always fall into their habitual practices, even if in very rare cases –when the scandal is too serious—they make timid purposes of amendment. In this particular case, such a strange silence clearly indicated that something fishy was going on.   

Back to the just-mentioned declarations: the first thing that calls one’s attention is that Archbishop Osoro, from out of the vast and rich Magisterium of the Church, refers only to Pope Francis, quoting twice from his Evangelii Gaudium (which Cardinal Burke has declared is not a part of the Magisterium). Faithful to post-conciliar tradition, Archbishop Osoro disregards any other Magisterial statements of past Popes, Councils, Encyclicals, Documents, Speeches, etc. True, his Declarations were made during a press conference and not in a theological treatise. Nevertheless, given that this is a widespread disease, one cannot but lament the documental poverty to which the Magisterium of the Church has been reduced, almost to nothing, in the post-conciliar era.

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